family

Posted by Ellen

 

I caught up with my niece Jessica and her fiance Brandon when they were on their way to the wedding of Jess's cousin Katie.

Posted by Ellen

 

An after-dinner moment.

(Standing, left to right: Amelia, Peter. Seated: Bob, Hank, Allen, David Klein.)

Posted by Ellen

After Thanksgiving dinner, there was a guitar and a mandolin, and dancing.

Posted by Ellen

Michele and Richard Manno try to pose for a picture on Formal Night during their recent Mediterranean cruise.

These people are related to me.

Posted by Ellen

The rocks are 400 million years old, give or take.

The photo is five years old.

The occasion was the birthday gathering on Peaks Island in Maine in honor of Bob Horowitz--my father, and the grandfather of these fellows--who was then 80 years old.

There's one obvious constant through all these years: some of us hominids are hard-wired to build forts and weapons and stuff out of rocks or whatever is close to hand.

Not as obvious, perhaps, but just as constant: some of us are hard-wired to knock down other people's forts and stuff. Hank recalls that he had to rebuild this whole structure all by himself. Had to.

My father will be 85 this next week. He's well beyond the stone age; most days, he aims for the Big Band era.

Left to right: Brothers Ted, Hank, Allen, and Joe Stein, with cousin Nick Horowitz.

Posted by Ellen

Family camping in 1891 was what it was--the striped skirts, the upside down teacups, and most notably, the tennis racket played as a guitar. "These people are related to me," observes West Coast painter Amy Crehore, who found the old snapshot in a box of old family treasures.

The woman making music on her tennis racket may be particularly closely related to Crehore, who often paints scenes in which women are playing ukeleles. Here is one of her recent works, "Monkey Love Song."